There’s Beauty Everywhere, if We only Look (a.k.a. after pandemic…before retirement)

Being forced to stay at home, we leave for nowhere and still arrive at somewhere that we’ve been to many, many times: our home. Before this Covid-19 pandemic and the incidental stay-at-home push by the health and governmental units, we failed to notice the many things that are out in the open surrounding us in our frenetic rush to work. Things have changed. Now we notice the countless things around us that we normally took for granted before. Our gardens, for example, are now given our attention, and we see plants and greeneries and hardscapes that used to be simply part of our blurred surrounding and landscape. As we are forced to take more walks around our house, instead of drive off from our house, we see how the lawn is actually green and some grass and weeds have started to migrate to the sidewalk, towards our walkways, and around our plantings and trees.

Yes, as you indulge in more of your outdoor activities, keep looking at things and places, and you’ll start noticing innumerable things that you haven’t paid much attention to before. Much less, appreciated.

AN AMAZING BEAUTY TO BEHOLD, not a mess to swipe at

Even the silky cobweb that’s attached to your garage wall and a nearby branch of a shrub, for example. That spider web was meticulously spun by the non-stop industry and dedication of the brown and black hairy arachnid resting now at the smallest of circles of the web, waiting for its next buffet. Before, all you might have noticed was a jumble of pesky, sticky spider web that needed to be swiped with a broom when you got the time. The cobweb was a nuisance, dirt to be cleaned.

But now, as you actually look more closely at the silky creation, you start wondering how a once-feared hairy ball called spider managed to stick one end of the silky yarn to the branch of the tree then have another end cling on to the side of your garage wall. Did it spun a long enough web that it used to swing itself like Spider Man to get to the garage wall? Or did it allow the softest of the breeze to carry the lightweight silky yarn to the garage wall, and allow the magic of the web’s gluey end to touch and then stick onto the wall? To get from one end of its silky string attached to the branch to the other end attached to the wall, did the spider do a tightrope-walk similar to what the late Charles Blondin (Jean Francois Gravelet) who was also known as The Great Blondin, did across the Niagara Falls? How did it actually stitch the various strands of its sticky spit to one another and manage to create a very distinct crisscrossing, zigzagging, interconnecting pattern that only its species can so beautiful and uniquely create? How long did it take the spider to complete its masterpiece? How much % of its life span has been devoted to making that web? When you start to ask questions like these, you inevitably come to a much greater appreciation of the beauty of its creation. You also develop a much clearer sympathy for the resourcefulness and the vulnerability of the spider to predatory birds and ever so fastidious housecleaning humans.

WINTER WONDERLAND, not painful shovellin’ and dangerous road skiddin’

Even the snow is so beautiful. You marvel at how it creates a virginal blanket of white on once unsightly rooftops, on the messy shrubberies and dead branches and twigs left forlornly lying on the once-beautiful beds and garden spaces of spring and summer just months before. The white, glistening cover even transforms the patchy lawn to a beautiful winter wonderland. When seen through the windows or up-close outdoors, the latest freak snowfall actually left beauty in its wake.

Yet, if we were in our usual frantic way of life as we had before the pandemic, we would have much-too-soon cursed under our thick jackets and billowing cloud of respiration all that snow for forcing us to shovel our driveways and sidewalks and to drive like we were just new, inexperienced drivers. A change in pace and perspective are all it takes to open our eyes to the once-cursed freak snowfall. Yeah, there’s beauty even in the “blunder” and ill-timing of nature.

The winter season has been a little more snowy than usual this year. Yet we should still rejoice. With this beautiful blanket of whiteness, it is mind-boggling to grasp the idea that this mass is comprised of billions of tiny particles we know as snowflakes. Even more mind-boggling is the idea that no two snowflakes are alike. What an incredible, omniscient, and omnipotent Creator we have!

LITTLE JOYS IN LIFE almost lost to eking out a living

Now, we appreciate the little joys in life, like the precious time to idly linger indoors with a cup of coffee. Before, we half-consciously gulped down our mug of scalding coffee while driving; some even couldn’t find time to brew coffee at home so a quick side-trip to McDo or Tim’s or Starbucks on the drive to work was all they could spare. Leisure and pleasure almost became sad victims to our rat race.

At first, the work-at-home sounded like a bad ordeal. But for those who are able to work in their pajamas and fluffy night sandals, should we continue with the complaints?

Truly, it’s oftentimes about how we take life, as a joyful journey or a long-drawn, dragged trek and race. I’m starting to enjoy life. Thanks, Covid pandemic.

RAINBOW always comes after the storm

The clear way to see beauty is to be happy and thankful. The best way to be happy is to be thankful. Thankful for the things we have, even thankful for the things we don’t have, for such missing thing might just be lead to unhappiness. Yes, thankful that we don’t have Covid. Thankful that we didn’t get laid off due to Covid’s economic fallout. Thankful that we get to stay at home and still get paid for it, somehow. Don’t rob yourself of your own joy by being negative rather than positive about anything. There’s always a rainbow after the rain, a silver lining once the storm has waned. There’s always tomorrow, until there truly is none. Cliched, yet worth repeating, remembering.

I can only look forward to life after retirement, hmmm…. I know I would have less money in my pocket, but that might also mean I have less weight to carry around. Perspective, it all boils down to one’s perspective, one’s take on life, and truly living.

Being forced to stay at home, we leave for nowhere and still arrive at somewhere that we’ve been to many, many times: our home. Before this Covid-19 pandemic and the incidental stay-at-home push by the health and governmental units, we failed to notice the many things that are out in the open surrounding us in […]

Being forced to stay at home, we leave for nowhere and still arrive at somewhere that we’ve been to many, many times: our home. Before this Covid-19 pandemic and the incidental stay-at-home push by the health and governmental units, we failed to notice the many things that are out in the open surrounding us in our frenetic rush to work. Things have changed. Now we notice the countless things around us that we normally took for granted before. Our gardens, for example, are now given our attention, and we see plants and greeneries and hardscapes that used to be simply part of our blurred surrounding and landscape. As we are forced to take more walks around our house, instead of drive off from our house, we see how the lawn is actually green and some grass and weeds have started to migrate to the sidewalk, towards our walkways, and around our plantings and trees.

Yes, as you indulge in more of your outdoor activities, keep looking at things and places, and you’ll start noticing innumerable things that you haven’t paid much attention to before. Much less, appreciated.

AN AMAZING BEAUTY TO BEHOLD, not a mess to swipe at

Even the silky cobweb that’s attached to your garage wall and a nearby branch of a shrub, for example. That spider web was meticulously spun by the non-stop industry and dedication of the brown and black hairy arachnid resting now at the smallest of circles of the web, waiting for its next buffet. Before, all you might have noticed was a jumble of pesky, sticky spider web that needed to be swiped with a broom when you got the time. The cobweb was a nuisance, dirt to be cleaned.

But now, as you actually look more closely at the silky creation, you start wondering how a once-feared hairy ball called spider managed to stick one end of the silky yarn to the branch of the tree then have another end cling on to the side of your garage wall. Did it spun a long enough web that it used to swing itself like Spider Man to get to the garage wall? Or did it allow the softest of the breeze to carry the lightweight silky yarn to the garage wall, and allow the magic of the web’s gluey end to touch and then stick onto the wall? To get from one end of its silky string attached to the branch to the other end attached to the wall, did the spider do a tightrope-walk similar to what the late Charles Blondin (Jean Francois Gravelet) who was also known as The Great Blondin, did across the Niagara Falls? How did it actually stitch the various strands of its sticky spit to one another and manage to create a very distinct crisscrossing, zigzagging, interconnecting pattern that only its species can so beautiful and uniquely create? How long did it take the spider to complete its masterpiece? How much % of its life span has been devoted to making that web? When you start to ask questions like these, you inevitably come to a much greater appreciation of the beauty of its creation. You also develop a much clearer sympathy for the resourcefulness and the vulnerability of the spider to predatory birds and ever so fastidious housecleaning humans.

WINTER WONDERLAND, not painful shovellin’ and dangerous road skiddin’

Even the snow is so beautiful. You marvel at how it creates a virginal blanket of white on once unsightly rooftops, on the messy shrubberies and dead branches and twigs left forlornly lying on the once-beautiful beds and garden spaces of spring and summer just months before. The white, glistening cover even transforms the patchy lawn to a beautiful winter wonderland. When seen through the windows or up-close outdoors, the latest freak snowfall actually left beauty in its wake.

Yet, if we were in our usual frantic way of life as we had before the pandemic, we would have much-too-soon cursed under our thick jackets and billowing cloud of respiration all that snow for forcing us to shovel our driveways and sidewalks and to drive like we were just new, inexperienced drivers. A change in pace and perspective are all it takes to open our eyes to the once-cursed freak snowfall. Yeah, there’s beauty even in the “blunder” and ill-timing of nature.

The winter season has been a little more snowy than usual this year. Yet we should still rejoice. With this beautiful blanket of whiteness, it is mind-boggling to grasp the idea that this mass is comprised of billions of tiny particles we know as snowflakes. Even more mind-boggling is the idea that no two snowflakes are alike. What an incredible, omniscient, and omnipotent Creator we have!

LITTLE JOYS IN LIFE almost lost to eking out a living

Now, we appreciate the little joys in life, like the precious time to idly linger indoors with a cup of coffee. Before, we half-consciously gulped down our mug of scalding coffee while driving; some even couldn’t find time to brew coffee at home so a quick side-trip to McDo or Tim’s or Starbucks on the drive to work was all they could spare. Leisure and pleasure almost became sad victims to our rat race.

At first, the work-at-home sounded like a bad ordeal. But for those who are able to work in their pajamas and fluffy night sandals, should we continue with the complaints?

Truly, it’s oftentimes about how we take life, as a joyful journey or a long-drawn, dragged trek and race. I’m starting to enjoy life. Thanks, Covid pandemic.

RAINBOW always comes after the storm

The clear way to see beauty is to be happy and thankful. The best way to be happy is to be thankful. Thankful for the things we have, even thankful for the things we don’t have, for such missing thing might just be lead to unhappiness. Yes, thankful that we don’t have Covid. Thankful that we didn’t get laid off due to Covid’s economic fallout. Thankful that we get to stay at home and still get paid for it, somehow. Don’t rob yourself of your own joy by being negative rather than positive about anything. There’s always a rainbow after the rain, a silver lining once the storm has waned. There’s always tomorrow, until there truly is none. Cliched, yet worth repeating, remembering.

I can only look forward to life after retirement, hmmm…. I know I would have less money in my pocket, but that might also mean I have less weight to carry around. Perspective, it all boils down to one’s perspective, one’s take on life, and truly living.

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