Creeping Jenny Eaten By Sawfly Larvae

What’s eating my Creeping Jenny?
Golden Creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia ‘Aurea’), is a staple in any garden. Used as a perennial ground cover or trailer for containers and hanging baskets – it grows in sun or shade.So when I walked through the garden this morning, something was awry. I noticed foliage had been eaten; nearly every leaf was damaged.On closer inspection, these Monostegia abdominalis larvae were happily munching away. Grrrr.

Great, here’s another alien insect, reeking havoc in Ontario. Another introduction from Europe we don’t need.These “caterpillars” are in fact sawfly larvae.  Check out this link by Kansas State University to see the difference.
In total, I collected 23 from this one spot.They are known to feed on foliage within the Loosestrife family of plants, which Creeping Jenny Lysimachia is classified under.No spraying necessary, it took me no more than 4 minutes to gather them. They are quite easy to find as their silver/grey coating is a great contrast to the lime green foliage. Do Note: once you touch them, they coil and drop off the leaves.  They are known to have 2-3 life cycles per season. These came out in late June, so keep checking your plants for any other generation that may come ‘calling’!One bonus, they became a great snack for our Koi fish in the pond.Here’s Wikipedia’s taxonomy description:  Monostegia abdominalisWhat’s eating my Creeping Jenny?
Golden Creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia ‘Aurea’), is a staple in any garden. Used as a perennial ground cover or trailer for containers and hanging baskets – it grows in sun or shade.So when I walked through the garden this morning, something was awry. I noticed foliage had been eaten; nearly every leaf was damaged.On closer inspection, these Monostegia abdominalis larvae were happily munching away. Grrrr.

Great, here’s another alien insect, reeking havoc in Ontario. Another introduction from Europe we don’t need.These “caterpillars” are in fact sawfly larvae.  Check out this link by Kansas State University to see the difference.
In total, I collected 23 from this one spot.They are known to feed on foliage within the Loosestrife family of plants, which Creeping Jenny Lysimachia is classified under.No spraying necessary, it took me no more than 4 minutes to gather them. They are quite easy to find as their silver/grey coating is a great contrast to the lime green foliage. Do Note: once you touch them, they coil and drop off the leaves.  They are known to have 2-3 life cycles per season. These came out in late June, so keep checking your plants for any other generation that may come ‘calling’!One bonus, they became a great snack for our Koi fish in the pond.Here’s Wikipedia’s taxonomy description:  Monostegia abdominalisWhat’s eating my Creeping Jenny?

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Golden Creeping Jenny (Lysimachia nummularia ‘Aurea’), is a staple in any garden. Used as a perennial ground cover or trailer for containers and hanging baskets – it grows in sun or shade.

So when I walked through the garden this morning, something was awry. I noticed foliage had been eaten; nearly every leaf was damaged.

On closer inspection, these Monostegia abdominalis larvae were happily munching away. Grrrr.

imageimage

Great, here’s another alien insect, reeking havoc in Ontario. Another introduction from Europe we don’t need.

These “caterpillars” are in fact sawfly larvae.  Check out this link by Kansas State University to see the difference.

image

In total, I collected 23 from this one spot.

They are known to feed on foliage within the Loosestrife family of plants, which Creeping Jenny Lysimachia is classified under.

No spraying necessary, it took me no more than 4 minutes to gather them. They are quite easy to find as their silver/grey coating is a great contrast to the lime green foliage. Do Note: once you touch them, they coil and drop off the leaves.  They are known to have 2-3 life cycles per season. These came out in late June, so keep checking your plants for any other generation that may come ‘calling’!

One bonus, they became a great snack for our Koi fish in the pond.

image

Here’s Wikipedia’s taxonomy description:  Monostegia abdominalis

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